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Polar Opposites

My wife and I handle the cold very differently. I’d shudder – in a literal sense – to think what would happen if we lived any farther north, and I’m sure she sweats when thinking of moving any farther south.

When it drops below 65 degrees, that’s when I put on a light jacket. She puts on a smile.

When it gets over 70 degrees, that’s when Ashley says it’s hot outside. I say it’s perfect.

When it gets below 50, I’m putting on a toboggan. She’s putting on a short-sleeved shirt.

When it gets above 80, she’s staying inside. I’m tossing on the flip-flops and shorts.

One thing we can agree on (I think) is that a North Carolina winter is as odd as it gets. We should know the routine by now, but it still surprises us each year.

It will be unseasonably warm one week in November, as if fall got skipped for spring, then a few weeks later a cold snap will make it look like fall, again, is giving way to winter.

December will have a few swings of temperature of 30-40 degree changes in one day.

January will be bitterly cold. But it probably won’t snow. It’s a dry cold.

February will have more swings of temperature and make everybody sick. Then it’ll have more freezing rain/sleet/snow than the other two months combined.

And March will be cooler than anyone wants to remember – heck it might even snow in the first week.

So as we’re gearing up for winter, I’m ready to put on my toboggan and wear the thickest coat I can find with 3 layers underneath – and maybe two pairs of socks if it gets too cold. Meanwhile, Ashley’s ready to all but roll the windows down.

Call that being ‘polar’ opposites.

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